Aspall Cyder - Cider and Vinegar

Vinegar Cocktails


Date
24th March 2014

Category
Cook & Eat


Vinegar cocktails are becoming the hot new trend in mixology, appearing on the menus of some of the top cocktail bars in London and New York. The Orange Tree pub in Richmond has been exploring the use of vinegar in some of their cocktails and last month, they invited Nathan Sloane from Aspall and Georgie Woods from Sipsmith to explore combining spirits with vinegar.

Vinegar cocktails aren’t a new concept. Back in the 18 th Century, syrup vinegar left over from preserving fruits, also known as a shrub, was mixed with liqueurs to balance drinks.  The flavour is different depending on the fruit and what else has gone into the preserving jar - this is where you can get really creative!

 

A lot of science goes in to making a great cocktail, and it all comes down to balance – not overpowering but not bland, the right amount of ice, and crucially not too sweet, not too sour. And that’s where vinegar comes in.

Where many cocktails traditionally get their acid balance from the use of lemon or lime, or sometimes other fruits like apples, vinegar offers a great alternative, with almost endless flavour possibilities.

The Diffords Guide recently wrote an extensive article about the use of aceatic Acid in cocktails, explaining some of the science behind it: "Acidity is incredibly important in drinks - a pH of less than 7 lends substance to everything from wine to soft drinks. In mixed drinks citric is the 'go to' acid, most commonly through lemon or lime juice, with malic acid arguably a close second through apples and grapes, then tartaric and lactic. But there's another, often overlooked acid that adds complexity to cocktails - acetic acid. Vinegar is an acetic acid and offers bartenders a wealth of new flavour opportunities, so much so that it formed the basis for a seminar at this year's recent Tales of the Cocktail."

Look out for our next post where we will be sharing some recipes to make your own Shrub and some tried and tested vinegar cocktail suggestions.

Acidity is incredibly important in drinks - a pH of less than 7 lends substance to everything from wine to soft drinks. In mixed drinks citric is the 'go to' acid, most commonly through lemon or lime juice, with malic acid arguably a close second through apples and grapes, then tartaric and lactic. But there's another, often overlooked acid that adds complexity to cocktails - acetic acid. Vinegar is an acetic acid and offers bartenders a wealth of new flavour opportunities, so much so that it formed the basis for a seminar at this year's recent Tales of the Cocktail.